What Credit Unions Need to Know About the Rise of Chip and PIN and Risk

According to the Federal Reserve, Chip and PIN technology involving a secure microchip used with a numeric code makes transactions about 700 times more secure than older payment methods.

Is Chip and PIN technology a priority at your credit union in 2015?

Join Ann Davidson, VP of Risk Consulting, Allied Solutions and Joe Majka, Vice President & Chief Security OffEmerging Payment Technologies & Impact on Data Breachesicer, Verifone Inc. on March 4th to learn about Chip and PIN technology and other emerging payment solutions (e.g., Apple Pay, tokenization, etc.) that can help your credit union reduce the risk of data breaches.

Ann advocates that credit unions seize the golden opportunity to reduce risk through the adoption of Chip and PIN technology and shares 5 things you need to know about the impact of the rise of Chip and PIN:

CHIP and PIN’s Golden Opportunity

Chip-and-PIN cards, also called EMV (Europay, Mastercard, Visa), or smart cards, utilize a computer chip embedded in the card to authenticate transactions. When this card is inserted into a chip-enabled reader to make a purchase, the chip on the card communicates with the reader by sending a one-time, dynamic code unique to that transaction.

Implementing Chip and PIN card technology prior to October 1st, when new fraud liability rules take effect will help your credit union:

  • Stop counterfeiting: Makes it impossible for criminals to create counterfeit cards with stolen data because Chip and PIN cards generate a one-time dynamic code that changes with each transaction.
  • Reduce data breach and fraud exposure: Decreases your credit union’s breach and fraud exposure when the physical card is used since Chip and PIN technology security far exceeds magnetic stripe technology.
  • Save time and resources: Cuts the time and resources used by your credit union to process fraud claimsChip and PIN Technology and card reissues associated with card data compromises.
  • Get a reputation boost: Builds your credit union’s reputation for member satisfaction, given that consumers are becoming more aware of available payment security options.
  • Facilitate easier international travel payments for members: Makes international travel payments easier in some cases. Much of the world, including Europe, Asia, and Canada, has already converted to chip technology and some international merchants and ATMs no longer accept magnetic stripe cards.

5 Things You Need to Know About Chip and PIN:

  1. If your credit union has not issued your members a Chip and PIN card, but a merchant has the new Chip and PIN technology, your credit union is held liable when fraud occurs.
  2. If you do not have chip-enabled cards by October 1st, you may be targeted by criminals and may have increased risk exposure to magnetic stripe fraud.
  3. Consider upgrading or replacing your ATM terminals to accept Chip and PIN technology before the card associations’ fraud liability shifts occur in 2016 and 2017.
  4. Credit unions should continue to deploy multiple layers of protection and enhance existing fraud detection systems to combat payment fraud in both the “card-present” and “card-not-present” environments.
  5. Chip-and-PIN does not address card-not-present fraud (i.e., online, mail, telephone, or lost/stolen card fraud).*

Increase your credit unions financial stability, reputation, and member/customer base by seizing the golden opportunity to get rid of risk through Chip and PIN technology Chip in 2015.

Get the knowledge your credit union needs by registering today for Allied Solutions’ Emerging Payment Technologies & Impact on Data Breaches webinar on Wednesday, March 4, 2015.

Presented by Allied Solutions, LLC and NAFCU Services, this webinar is offered at no cost to the credit union community. *Working with Allied Solutions to establish risk management procedures and get cyber liability protection can help mitigate this risk.

 

New Perspectives on Vendor Due Diligence

Guest post written by Vanessa Stanfield, Client Program Director, Vendor Management, Affinion Group.

headshot_blogNow that I’m fully immersed in the world of credit unions, I’m so impressed by the incredible emphasis on members and the cooperative spirit.  The majority of my prior experience was spent working in the insurance division of a major national bank.  My roles varied from vendor management to product management – hot topics for financial institutions of all sorts.  I’m very grateful for the perspectives I gained elsewhere now that I dig into my new responsibilities with Affinion Benefits Group.  Affinion has built the culture, infrastructure, and systems to support and serve our credit union clients in many proven and innovative ways.

On any given day, my work presents me with a few key areas of focus:

1. Facilitating the completion of client due diligence requests in an efficient, thorough, and streamlined manner

Read more

Aligning CU Executive Incentives With CU Goals and Member Needs

By David Frankil, President, Burns-Fazzi, Brock and Associates

Dr. Jack Clark from Clark Research Associates presented the results of the 2014 NAFCU-BFB Executive Compensation and Benefits Survey at this summer’s NAFCU Annual Conference.  There were many tidbits in the presentation, but one topic caught my eye – the wide variety of incentives that Boards have used to create bonus plans for top executives.

The topic of how incentives affect behavior is far from new – go back to freshman-year economics and Adam Smith –

“It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own self-interest.”

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature & Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Vol 1, March 9, 1776

Just as water finds its own level, economic activity naturally seeks its highest and most efficient use.  That’s not to say that the greater good is subverted to individual self-interest, rather that well-designed compensation models effectively align individual incentives with desired outcomes that benefit the credit union, its members and top executives.

On that we can probably all agree – but what are the metrics and desired outcomes that will create optimal goal alignment?  To use a baseball analogy, home runs are great – but rewarding players just based on home runs would result in tons of shortstops and second basemen batting .075 as they swung from the heels every time up at the plate.  You’d have a hard time finding anyone who wanted to pitch too.

Read more

Developing the Next Leaders Within Your Credit Union

By Peter Myers, MSC, PCC, Vice President, DDJ Myers

If I told you that you could handpick a group of leaders who would be perfectly invested in your credit union, would you jump at the chance? Now what if I told you these potential leaders may be individuals who you already interact with every day? Of course, I’m talking about looking within your own organization and identifying emerging leaders from your staff, and then providing them the training to transform into leaders and thinkers who exceed expectations for both you and your members.

Who Is an Emerging Leader in Your Credit Union?

To identify emerging leaders within your ranks, I encourage you to cast a wide net and look beyond obvious candidates such as vice presidents and other upper management. Perhaps there’s a team leader, a department manager, or a teller supervisor who has shown leadership potential by delivering excellent member service or proactively helping on team projects. By paying close attention and identifying those employees who put your credit union values into action, you may be surprised at how many of your staff have the potential to exceed expectations and grow into leadership roles. … Read more

Debt: The Inheritance No One Wants

Originally posted on CUInsight.

Guest post written by Kristi Nelson, Second VP and Actuary, Securian Financial Group

Second VP and Actuary
Second VP and ActuarSecurian Financial Group

Have you thought about what would happen to your debt when you die?

When Securian Financial Group posed that question to 1,004 Americans of all ages in an online survey last September, nearly one third (31 percent) said they had not thought about it.

Lopsided personal finances

Among the respondents in Securian’s recent survey who hold debt as primary borrowers or cosigners, significant percentages could leave behind large financial obligations if they died. Twenty percent owe $100,000 or more. Forty-four percent owe $25,000 or more. … Read more